Home Administration & Policy Justice Administration: Police, Courts and Corrections Management, 7th Edition, Ken Peak

Justice Administration Police, Courts and Corrections Management, 7th Edition

This seventh edition of Justice Administration: Police, Courts, and Corrections Management continues its examination of all facets of the criminal justice system as well as several related matters of interest to prospective and current administrators. The general goal of the book is to inform the reader of the primary people, practices, and terms that are utilized in justice administration.  The author has held several administrative and academic positions in a criminal justice career spanning more than 35 years; thus, this book’s 16 chapters contain a palpable real-world flavor not found in most textbooks.

From the Publisher

This text provides a single-author exploration of justice administration that encompasses all three components of the criminal justice system — police, courts, and corrections — as well as other contemporary administrative matters. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

PREFACE

This third edition of Justice Administration: Police, Courts, and Corrections Management continues to be the sole book of its kind: a single author’s examination of all facets of the criminal justice system as well as several related matters of interest to prospective and actual administrators. This edition represents a general updating of materials, with a new chapter concerning special administrative challenges: personnel discipline, liability, and labor relations. Several real-world vignettes have been included as well, taken from such sources as Law Enforcement News and courts- and corrections-related newsletters. In addition, new chapter sections have been incorporated on sexual harassment, ethics and values, workload allocation and deployment, and truth in sentencing. New community policing case studies are included as well. Several chapter sections have been expanded, including those on communication, stress, technology, community oriented policing and problem solving, and alternative dispute resolution. A new appendix lists related Web sites.

The author brings both a scholarly and practical administrative background to this effort. As a result, the chapters contain a “real-world” flavor not found in most administration textbooks.

The purpose and organization of this book are discussed in Chapter would like to add some prefatory comments as well, however. First, it is still my belief that while the criminal justice system is currently much maligned in many quarters in our society and may well continue to be criticized for many years in the new millennium, it is still the best system in the world. During my 30 years in “the business” as a police and corrections practitioner and administrator, planner, and educator, I have met hundreds of dedicated practitioners, both administrative and rank and file. I can say unequivocally that this discipline continues to be a special calling, containing countless dedicated people of exceedingly high ability and moral character.

Criminal justice is a people business. This book reflects that fact as it looks at human foibles and some of the problems of personnel and policy in justice administration. Thanks to many innovators in the field, however, a number of exciting innovations and positive activities are occurring. The general goal of the book is to inform the reader of the primary people, practices, and terms that are utilized in justice administration.

There may well be activities, policies, actions, and my own views with which the reader will disagree. This is not at all bad, because in the management of people and agencies there are no absolutes, only ideas and attempts to make the system better. The case studies appearing at the end of each major part of the book are intended to allow the reader to experience some of the kinds of problems confronted daily by justice administrators. With a fundamental knowledge of the system, and a reading of the chapters in the respective book part, readers should be able to arrive at several feasible solutions to each problem that is presented.

From its beginning through the final chapter, the text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging positions that one can occupy in America: administrator of a criminal justice agency.

I kindly solicit your input concerning any facet of this textbook. Feel free to contact me if you have ideas for improving it. Acknowledgments

This edition, like its two predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several people. First, I continue to benefit from the guidance of the staff at Prentice Hall. This effort again involved Nell Marquardt, former acquisitions editor, and Kim Davies and Marian Gottlieb, my new editors. I was again (for the sixth occasion) quite fortunate in being able to work with my friend and production editor, Linda Pawelchak. Copy editing was masterfully accomplished by Nancy Menges.

The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of John O. Ballard, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Michael T Hanna, Missouri Western State College, whose reviews resulted in many beneficial changes in this third edition.

Furthermore, case study materials were contributed by the following administrators and practitioners, all of whom I am proud to consider friends and thorough professionals (their titles and affiliations are listed in the text, following their respective case study): Ron Angelone, Linda Dits, Ron Glensor, Ted Heim, Richard Kirkland, Matt Leone, Catherine Lowe, Dennis Metrick, Burt Scott, and Glen Whorton.

Product Details :

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 7 edition (November 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 013270899X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0132708999
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.3 x 0.7 inches

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